Visa Run

We just retuned from a short trip to Singapore to renew our visas. With numerous stories being told of some employees experiencing a quick, 24-hour turnaround, and other employees experiencing a long, frustrating wait (up to 4-6 weeks), our fate was left in the hands of the Indonesian Embassy. We had nothing but an indeterminable amount of time to kill in the “Fine City.”

Fortunately, luck was on our side (although, an extra 3-4 days in Singapore would have been spectacular). The day after submitting our passports, we were informed that our visas had been processed and approved. The scheduling of our return flights gave us two full days to go shopping (including, of all things, buying much needed and wanted dishwasher pellets) and to see a few of Singapore’s little gems. During that time, we explored Little India and visited Gardens by the Bay.

Little India

The street that leads into Little India.

The street that leads into Little India.

An ornate Hindu temple in Little India.

An ornate Hindu temple located in the middle of Little India.

Sometimes we see and experience strange things during our travels. While we were in Little India, we ate lunch at a little restaurant called The Jungle Tandoor. At first sight, it reminded us of the Rainforest Cafe. After a closer look, we started to realize that the Singaporean Indians don't seem to be in touch with their ancestral roots. Our first clue should have been when we passed through the front doors, which were flanked by Native Americans. Inside, the dining room was scattered with animals from the rainforest (including monkeys, elephants, toucans, and lizards). Then, we noticed polar bears, dinosaurs, bald eagles, and seagulls mixed in with the grouping.

Sometimes we see and experience strange things during our travels. While we were in Little India, we ate lunch at a little restaurant called The Jungle Tandoor. At first sight, it reminded us of the Rainforest Cafe. During closer examination, we started wondering if the Singaporean Indians are having a hard time staying in touch with their ancestral roots. The front door was flanked by Native American Indians, not Indians from India. Inside, the jungle-themed dining room was filled with palm trees, ferns, and animals of the rainforest, including monkeys, elephants, toucans, and lizards. Then, we started noticing things that didn’t quite belong, including polar bears, dinosaurs, bald eagles, seagulls, and an Indian chief swinging from a vine. With all that said, it was an entertainingly quirky restaurant with good food!

Gardens by the Bay

The Super Trees during daylight.

Singapore’s Super Trees during daylight. A walking structure allows visitors to walk at the same height of a rainforest canopy, offering fantastic views of the gardens and the city.

Ally standing in front of the gardens' Super Trees.

Ally standing in front of the gardens’ Super Trees.

The Super Trees at the Gardens at the Bay at dusk.

The Super Trees at dusk, taken on the walking structure.

The Singapore Flyer (on the left) and the Super Trees (on the right).

The Singapore Flyer on the left (which we rode during last year’s visa trip) and the Super Trees on the right.

After leaving Singapore, and before going back to jobsite, we were required to stop in Timika to complete biometrics (fingerprints and photos) for immigration. Our one-night stop turned into a three night and four day delay. Timika wasn’t our preferred location to be stuck, but the girls enjoyed shopping for Papuan artifacts at the wood-shops, going to the Timika Mall (which consists of, maybe, 8 stores), and chasing frogs by the pool.

Kylee trying to locate a frog that jumped from her hand to her chest.

Kylee hanging out at the Rimba Papua Hotel pool. She was trying to locate a tiny frog that jumped from her hand onto her chest.

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